Friday, 4 November 2016

Healthy eating for one.

Hello. It's been a week since I did that massive shop at Tesco. I was really low on food so had to stock up on almost everything. I still have lots left, mainly tins and frozen, but my fresh stuff is getting low again, so I went to Aldi today and did a small top up shop. I needed vegetables and salady stuff, and eggs, and bananas, and bread, and cheese, and more nuts, gotta have nuts. 
This is the lunch I had today. Mushrooms, tomato, cucumber, potato salad, pickled onions, brie cheese, Quorn sausage, and a cheese and onion crispy bake. Very nice it was too.
 Tonight was my usual steamed vegetables with a sprinkling of grated cheese. I could scoff broccoli every day, I love the taste of it. Still got some home grown beans in the freezer.

A leaflet came through the door the other day, from the church. It is a thank you card to show their appreciation for the support they get from the parishioners, and has a list of services for the following weeks. . Everyone gets one regardless of whether they go to church or not. A large part of the leaflet is taken up with a list of ten churchyard rules which go into great detail about what is and isn't acceptable regarding the decoration of graves. I think quite a few people will be upset by this because such a lot of things are not allowed. There is a detailed list, plastic flowers, pot plants, statues, garden ornaments, lights, windmills, pottery and glass, are just a few of the things.

I can't see the harm in a few plastic flowers, people can't afford to put expensive fresh flowers on their grave all the time, and if the relative is not able to visit on a regular basis, plastic flowers would be ideal. There are some people that have gone right over the top though, with their decorations. They are going to be mighty upset if they have to remove everything. I do think it is a bit harsh of the church, some of the rules are a bit over the top, there should be some wiggle room in some cases. There is a grave alongside the wall on the edge of the graveyard which is a small child. The mother has been coming almost every week for years to tend it. She takes the soft toys away for washing and brings them back, she adds cards for the child's birthday and Christmas, and swaps the old toys for new ones. I shall be very sad to see this go.

It's the weekend again, the weeks are flying by and it's getting colder. Nowt else to tell you so I'll buzz off. Thanks for popping in, we'll catch up soon.
Toodle pip.

16 comments:

  1. I feel sad for that mother with the lost child...Your meals always look so good! Have a happy weekend!

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  2. is the graveyard part of/owned by the church?

    it seems a very long/intrusive list.

    I am thinking that someone important in the church must have complained (if it is owned by the church)..........

    I suppose some can get over the top..still...
    what can it hurt?

    I think that Mother who has been tending the child's grave, is her self going to be in grave distress if this comes to pass. One hopes some Christian Compassion and Christian Charity may evidence itself, at least to her and others like her.

    If this graveyard is part of the Church, it pretty much has to be someone "important"/ rich etc who has complained, otherwise the Church Officers /Clergy would not dare to send such a letter, for fear of "offending".

    Will be interested to hear, if you find out more on this...

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    1. Hello. I think these new rules have come about because someone mentioned that there are a couple of small ashes plots which have been made bigger with decorations, making it difficult for the relatives of neighbouring plots to keep theirs tidy. Some have pushed the boundaries a bit too far. I can see that elderly people might fall if they couldn't reach their plot. There is one ashes plot which has grown far to big and it does look a mess with all the tat. The woman does visit it every day, I suppose this helps her make a connection with her lost adult son.

      To apply the new rules to all parts of the churchyard is a bit heavy handed I think. The baby's grave is on it's own and no one needs to go near it apart from those who tend it. Hardly a hazard.

      They are getting a bit short of space, the church yard belongs to the church, and a new burial ground has been located on the edge of the village.

      Everyone has been given six weeks to make adjustments, I wait to see what happens next.

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  3. A few little bits are ok but not tons of stuff. That lady who tends the child's grave so well will be devastated. I agree with you - some wriggle room should be allowed. I hope something is worked out so she can go on as she has been doing. Natalie

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    1. Yes, I think she will be devastated. It's not harming anyone, but I suppose they have had to make the rules for everyone.

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  4. I would agree that the church should employ abit of flexibility. I have my husbands ashes at home two years on as the right time to decide what to do with them hasn't yet presented itself to us. They sat in the inglenook for two winters and now they have moved to a different nook upstairs. My teenage daughter needs a place to leave letters to her Dad about things that are happening in her life that she wants to share with him, along with small tangible things associated with him. It brings a lot of comfort. These things are important.
    Your food plate looks so good. Back in the 80s when I was 24 and in my first job with the Wildlife Trust I once met an elderly lady in Blackburn, who drove a Morris minor and looked after a stray Alsatian she found tied up in the park. We chatted and she invited me for tea and had exactly the same approach to eating as you. I went often to chat about her years as a teacher in North Wales and all the walks she used to do. I loved the mix of tastes at every simple meal we shared and she tried (!) To teach me to crochet. I was very glad stopped for a chat with a stranger that day. ENJOY your weekend. Your blog is better than any grief book I have read. I admire your positive, get up and go spirit not to mention the colour in your life. Its fab!

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  5. Me again ... I was just drinking my morning tea thinking about your meals and looking through your food photo gallery and just had to say that the plate of wholemeal spaghetti and mushy peas is so appealing. Two great ingredients. So simple, wholesome, cheap and easy to cook! It made me smile.

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  6. Grieving is complex & being able to dress your loved one's grave with items that are meaningful can help. One churchyard near me is a mess all summer with very long grass to 'support wildlife' which gets my goat. They need to keep it tidier, and I would point that out if they ever said grave decorations were banned!

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  7. I could eat veggies for all meals forever love them! That photo of you and Rocky is so sweet.

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  8. Great food as usual Ilona. The churchyard issue is complex; we all have different ideas of commemorating lost loved ones. Some graves are choc-a-block with flowers/toys etc, others less so. The point is I think, the Christian church may wish to adhere to the philosophy of tolerance (one of the beliefs of the Church and followers). And, with respect to the mourners, it is up to them to be thoughtful about not encroaching on neighbouring plots. The picture of you and Rocky is my favourite so far. Amanda

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  9. I didn't know whether to cry or smile when I saw the photo of you and Rocky cuddled up together. It's so sweet.

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  10. Yes, lovely picture of you and Rocky. Rocky looks like he's smiling too!

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  11. Forget to say; your 'dinner' photograph - lovely, but the ringed carrots made me cringe, I love carrots but since school (30+ years ago) I'm sure the cooks put the cabbage and ringed carrots on to boil at about 9am to served lunch at 12.30. A horrid plated of over-cooked mush. I can happily eat lightly cooked, crunchy cabbage, but have to prepare carrots in 'batons', no ringed carrots in this household - too many appalling memories! Amanda

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  12. Love the photo of you and dear Rocky. Jackie

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  13. I agree with the above comment about carrots, we too have to have them in batons after being put off of past ringed carrots. I too, agree that the photo of you and Rocky is the best one yet. You both look so happy.

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  14. I cannot get to my family grave very often and we have left a few plastic flowers, what's wrong with that? I think it is enough to say that people need to respect the limits of the boundaries of their plot. As you buy the burial ground it is actually your own property although the cemetary grounds care takers maintain it, so I think there should be more compromise, after all, it's a good thing that people attend and care for them. I think the church should be thankfull for that.

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