Wednesday, 16 April 2014

Not back breaking work.

Hello. I'm all for making household chores easy for myself, I do only as much as I need to, to keep things ticking over. Today I will share a load of washing with you. It's a warm and sunny day with a gentle breeze  so a good opportunity to strip the bed. The washing is in the machine, a 30 minute cycle at 30 degrees. My method of transferring it from the machine to the garden is not a conventional plastic basket. I don't drag it all out in one big pile, all tangled up, and drop it straight into the basket. By the time it gets untangled and hung up it's already creased. 
I don't have a basket because I don't like having to bend down and remove the items piece by piece as I hang it. This tall seat is what I use for transportation. I carefully take the washing out of the machine, shake it flat, and lay it on the chair. 
Like this. Heidi getting in on the picture again, ha ha.
I lift the whole lot up, chair and washing, without bending down, and pick up the pegs hanging on the nail on the back door. This keeps me in an upright position and doesn't put a strain on my back. When I peg out there is no bending down. I can move the chair along the length of the line if I need to. Mostly I just walk up and down, removing items one at a time as I hang them.

When the washing is dry and ready to be brought in I have the chair close by. I shake each item and fold, and lay it on the chair, starting with the largest items first. Again, no bending down to put it in a basket. When all washing is collected it takes hardly any effort to lift the chair a few inches keeping my back straight, and taking it all inside. It is then ready to be put away, but in the case of this load it will go straight back on the bed. I don't iron anything, can't be bothered with such mundane tasks. I don't buy clothes that need ironing. 
I have two sizes of wooden spring pegs, the bigger ones for the larger and heavier items. The smaller ones for such things as teeshirts, pillowcases, and pants. 
I also have some coloured plastic pegs. These are no good at all for hanging washing out. They are not strong enough for the job and they break easily. They are however very useful for clipping together the tops of half used packets of food stuffs. I like to keep things in their original packaging so I can check on the dates now and again. 
That's my washday system, it works for me. Have you got a system?
Toodle pip.

14 comments:

  1. Most stuff goes on a cold wash.I'm lucky that I can hang the laundry on the line from just inside the laundry room door,there is no way on earth I could carry a loaded basket from the laundry room to outside..The line is at second story level to catch the breezes..and so that curious wildlife can't get at it.
    Jane x

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  2. No system for me, but I take undue pleasure in hanging out my washing. :)

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  3. I put my washing in the washer at night and use the timer on the machine. That way I can put the washing out as soon as I get up meaning it dries quicker (or sometimes just catches the best of the day if its going to rain). I am lucky enough to have a laundry, so all the washing for the family gets sorted in there with separate baskets. When its dry it is put into individual piles on the worktop. I have trained them all to take there own pile up and put it all away. I only iron H's shirts and the odd dress. I like you idea with the chair, I could see that could be easier. Debbie

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  4. I use a quick wash programe and its a cold wash fill, I do not use wash powders, I bought wash balls with little stones inside , more enviromentally friendly and no need for powders , these little wash balls last for years and my washing is very very clean. . I use a trolly for transporting the wet washing either to the line or to the bathroom where I dry things in the winter etc. I use hangers for my shirts/blouses , trousers and skirts small things go on the clothes horse etc, As for Ironing, in 3 yrs I might have ironed only a couple of things, before I moved I used to stand for 2 to 3 hours ironing every thing even towel edges and socks, not now, a quick fold is all I do now, unless I really have to press something. ===== Danneke

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  5. We don't have an outside line, which is a pity, as clothes hung outside always smell lovely. However, we have a staircase with a half landing and loads of space above it. A couple of years ago, we got one of the old fashioned clothes driers (the one you haul up on a cord) and our washing now disappears up into the previously wasted heat lurking there and dries in a very short time. I am lucky, my excellent 'system' usually involves my husband doing the washing and ironing...I would not dream of complaining about the off grey undies!

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  6. Living in Australia the weather is much different to yours but our washing ideas are very close. If you have half an hour to spare I could probably find my iron but off-hand I dont really know where it is. I buy a special wash powder that is good for the garden as all grey water is used on the plants. We have discovered a plastic peg made in Australia that is so strong and lasts forever as it has a UV rating as the sun soon ruins any pegs.Our bed linen usually goes straight back on the bed as the smell is to die for and with our climate means the clothes are dry before noon.

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  7. I haven't got a washing machine or drier so everything is done by hand (I don't have many clothes and the absolute minimum in household linens). The soapy water goes straight onto the garden). I haven't got a clothes line either so all my stuff is hung over two bushes. I suppose it what you get used to. Natalie

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  8. Plastic pegs are useless in NE Scotland gales. I end up having to use several on each item of clothing or I spend half the day chasing washing round the garden! Wooden pegs are definitely much much stronger. Like you, I use plastic pegs to seal packets of food. As you say, if you keep things in their original packaging, you can check the use by dates to see what needs used up first. Low temperature quick cycle for our washing too, and only use a tiny amount of laundry liquid.

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  9. My system is pretty similar to yours though I dont use a chair as the washer is by the back door and just a step to the twirly thing. I dont iron unless it for a "special do" which is very rare but I always fold all the washing when I get it out of the machine even if I am going to hang it straight away. This seems to get most of the wrinkles out before they dry in place. Su

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  10. Mary in Perth Australia17 April 2014 at 13:20

    Another one in Australia here. I have a 'whirly' style clothes line and also one under cover, which is useful on hot, sunny days so the clothes don't bake stiff or fade in the sun. We tend to hang our clothes inside out because of the fading problem. I wash on a quick warm cycle and hang out straight away to avoid creases. Only iron work clothes. I buy my pegs when I'm in England, as well as my dishcloths etc. Like you, plastic pegs for kitchen use. Good idea re the chair.
    Happy Easter by the way

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  11. I us a basket to get to the line, which is a rotary line, I put my basket on the patio table and hang the underwear in the centre with plastic pegs then socks, plastic pegs again. Then tee shirt, blouses with stronger plastic pegs shirts, trousers and jeans go on with wooden pegs. the only thing I am a bit OCD about is plastic pegs, they have to be the same colour and not clash with the garment. I have not ironed anything for the last 2 years and only occasionly before that.

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  12. I try to use the quick cool wash wherever possible and it all goes on the line. I only use the tumble drier if I have to, far too expensive to use now. Gosh I sound like my mother, lol.

    X x

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  13. Pretty much do as you do, but have no outdoor line as my last one broke. Haven`t been able to replace it yet, but intend to invest in a rotary one, eventually. I use a basket to take the washing out the machine and rely on my tumble drier for now.

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  14. Your tall seat is a brilliant idea. I have a bad back at the moment and have been struggling with putting out the washing in the conventional way. I shall look out for a folding seat!

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