Wednesday, 2 September 2015

Thumbs up for the teef ;o)

Hello. Good news on the toothy peg front, me gnashers are good, don't need any treatment, £18.80 paid for checkup, don't need to go for another year. Brushing and flossing is good for teeth, it saves you money, and pain. Clean teeth every morning and every night. Don't go to bed with dirty teeth, even if you are dead tired. Don't have a mug of cocoa in bed then go to sleep. Get up and go to the bathroom and brush. Don't drink that first cuppa of the day before you have brushed your teeth. Get up and brush first, then go downstairs and make a drink. Or get someone else to make it for you. These are the rules ;o)

My dentist is very nice, she is called Emma. She gives me a thorough check up around my whole mouth, sticks her fingers in, put your tongue to the left, and to the right, stick your tongue out. She prods and pokes about. Today she didn't have to say anything to her assistant who takes the notes, there was nothing to write down.

I had a terrible fear of dentists as a child. I remember going to the school dentist when I was at junior school. A big man came to the school once in a while, we all had to go and see him. It was an old building, there was a coal fire in the grate, and his sausage dog lay next to it. There wasn't a chair to sit in, you had to stand in front of the dentist with your mouth wide open. I remember having a tooth out, he dabbed some foul tasting brown liquid on it with cotton wool, then took a pair of pliers and yanked it out. He was horrible, I hated it.

When I was a bit older mum took me to a dentist in town, he worked from home, it was a big house and his front room was his surgery. His name was Mr Brown, everyone called him Butcher Brown. Another horrible man, more bad experiences.I was scared to death of him. Mum only took us if we were in pain, we never had regular check ups because my mum was scared of dentists herself. Eventually when I left school and started working, I found another dentist, Mr Stone in New Street was much better, though I only went when I had to.

When I went to live in Blackpool I went with my friend to the dentist, she was happy to go. I remember I had toothache on one particular occasion and she said come in with me and see the dentist. I said no, and stood outside waiting for her. I was in agony but wouldn't go in. Then some children came and happily skipped in through the door. I felt ashamed that I was too much of a coward to go in. Eventually the pain got so bad, and I thought of the children going in, and thought if they can do it I can do it. So I plucked up courage to go, and after that went more regularly. After three years living in Blackpool I went back home, and picked up with Mr Stone again. I stayed with him for many years until I moved away again.

When I came to live here I went to a dentist that someone recommended. I didn't like him though, he didn't say much and I like to be kept informed about what is going to happen. I don't like surprises, I want them to be nice to me. I mentioned it to my next door neighbour, who luckily enough was a dentist practice manager. She said come to our surgery, ring up and make an appointment, so I did. And that's how I met Emma. I will stick with her. Everyone at the practice is nice as well, the receptionists, and assistants, it's even nice sitting in the waiting room. It's a bit further for me to drive there, as it's the other side of town, but worth it so I'll keep going.

Anyway, that's my teef, now share your teef stories.

Tomorrow I will start getting a few things together for the holiday. Looking forward to that. Three blog readers have said they might be able to meet up, if they can spare the time. That would be nice, but if you can't ladies, don't worry. I don't expect people to drop what they are doing if you have commitments elsewhere. I have added an extra day to the holiday, a friend who used to live here in the village now lives near Great Yarmouth, so I'm going over there to visit. That will be nice.

Off to bed now. Thanks for popping in. Toodle pip

30 comments:

  1. A thought struck me- both ends checked out just fine for you!
    JanF

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  2. Another one here who also has a lifelong fear of the dentist due to a horrible school dentist and then another horrible NHS one. Your school experience sounds almost identical to mine. I'm still not a fan although the NHS lady I have now is okay. But I had a root canal done 4 years ago and was in so much pain and discomfort while the nerve was being killed off that once the treatment was complete it was another 2 years before I went back again. I returned due to a cracked tooth that needed filling and have since had a further check up and will go again in 6 months. I do brush every morning and night but hate trying to use floss...it puts my teeth on edge (ha,ha) and makes me cringe so I don't use it every day. I know in future I would opt to have a tooth extracted rather than have the palaver of another root canal.

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    1. Hi. I have heard horrible stories about root canal work, I couldn't go through that. Get it out I say. If it's at the front get a bridge to fill the gap.

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    2. I've had more than my share of - awful - root canal work done over the years. The trouble is that it's hard to completely remove the nerve in the root right to the end; so abscess can occur. I've even had to have my gum cut open at a dental hospital to sort things out. I take a lot of care of my teeth (you can't even get on a transplant list if your teeth are not OK as immunosuppressants put you at high risk of deadly infections)

      Now I find, at my dentist, they won't even do root canal work for anyone! Hospital waits can even be a year long. This could just be London - hopefully better elsewhere.

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    3. Can you buy the floss picks over there in the UK? They make flossing an absolute breeze .... no longer will you have to break off a length of floss and try to angle it in between your teeth! That was so tiresome I wouldn't floss but I do now, using these little picks. They are a tooth saver.

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    4. I didn't enjoy my one and only root canal, but it wasn't that bad, either. Most women I know would agree with me. Most men have to take two days off work "because I had root canal work!" I will say, whether you are phobic about dentists or not, some people simply have a lower tolerance for pain. Nothing against them--it's just how it is. My MIL was one of the hardest workers I ever met (waitressed for 45 years) but she had no tolerance for pain whatsoever.

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  3. I'm sharing a link to an old post of mine. I'm dabbling in a writers project hosted by Natalia at In the Writers closet. This prompt was about going to the dentist. It seemed like a good reply to your post.

    http://samandwriting.blogspot.com/2015/08/on-going-to-dentist.html

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  4. Good job on the teeth and you are right...I once had a dentist drill without anesthetic and that left me in pain and floods of tears as a kid. It was many years until I found the dental practice I use now where everyone is nice and understands what to do to reassure and not cause pain. I would not trade them.

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  5. Glad you got a good report from your dentist. That is a great price, £18.80! Last month my dentist visit cost $170 (£111) for nothing special, just a cleaning and check-up, an increase of $30 from last time. I really like my dentist but she is expensive compared to the chain dental offices.

    I'm looking forward to your holiday!

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  6. I've never been afraid of the dentist...probably got toughened up by the NHS dentist who didn't numb my mouth when I had a filling....even when the drill broke in my tooth. Now I zone out in the chair,I get so chilled I've nodded off a couple of times. Floss is my best friend ,I may not have any make up in my handbag,but I've always got floss!
    Good teefs helps overall health..glad yours are healthy!
    Jane x

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    1. You're right Jane. Rotting food stuck between your teeth, spreading bacteria throughout your mouth can be the start of all kinds of illnesses.

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  7. I travel to Preston for my dentist after being terrified and then being recommended a good patient one. But I'm glad I keep them in check now. X

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    1. Stick with it, Laura. You can always combine your trip with a bit of shopping or art gallery browsing, and if you have a bus pass, no transport costs.

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  8. I've been going to the same dental practice since we got married 43 years ago. Even when we moved house we changed our GP but not our dentist. Over the years our actual dentists have changed but not the friendly, caring attitude, thankfully. That reminds me, I have an appointment this month too for a check up...£18.80 is it now?

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    1. Yep, that's what my dentist charged me, I think it's pretty standard. I go to Oasis, they have branches all over the place, part of a big organisation.

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  9. Even though I've been going to the dentist since I was aged 3, I am still terrified of my visits. Never once have I been hurt or badly treated but the fear starts about 2 days prior to my appointments (which are luckily once a year) and I have really bad diarrhoea and nervous tummy! Ridiculous I know. I would rather have a smear test than a dental check up any day. (Mrs LH)

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    1. Hi. Oh dear, have you told the dentist about this? They might be able to give you some advice to help calm you down. Don't be shy or embarrassed about it, it happens to a lot of people, they are used to it.

      Reminds me of when I started driving a truck, I had to go to the toilet about six times before I was able to get in the cab and drive off, ha ha.

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    2. Hi, I'm sure he knows how scared I get as if I'm having a long procedure, he'll stop half way through and let me have a rest. Last December I gripped my hands together so hard that I ripped my tendons in my middle finger of my left hand resulting in mallet finger in a splint for 6 weeks....I only had a check up!!

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  10. I just visited my dentist yesterday for a follow up on a crown he did for me. Because I recently moved, I am a new patient to him. As he was explaining something to me about my sore teeth, he turned to me and said, "Do you have hearing loss?", I replied, "yes" and kept looking at him and it was silent. I though maybe the hearing loss was somehow related to the teeth problems, but then after a very long pause he said, "well, you are shouting at me." I was so embarrassed and apologised profusely straight away. He turned away and continued explaining to me and seemed quite annoyed.
    I had worn my hearing aids to the previous appointment, but because of the dental work they kept on making loud interference (screeching noise) sounds which is really unpleasant, so I didn't wear them to this appointment. I was so embarrassed that I was shouting and also so uncomfortable that he seemed annoyed with me. I left feeling really uncomfortable.

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    1. Hi. No need to feel embarrassed. I shout sometimes as well, don't know I am doing it. My sister is always telling me not to shout, it really bugged me. Her hearing is now deteriorating and she has a hearing aid, so now she is shouting as well.

      I always wear my hearing aid to the dentist and don't have a problem. What you could do is keep it in until you get into the surgery, and after speaking to the dentist before he is going to work on you, tell him you are now taking it out and won't be able to hear him so he will have to speak up. He was a bit rude to say what he did, but if you had warned him it might not have happened.

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  11. From Margie in Toronto - nothing as horrendous as you but can't say I was very fond of childhood dentists. But my dad was a fanatic on us taking care of our teeth - he and my mom had bad teeth due to poor nutrition and scary dentists as children. About 30 years ago I got a referral to my current dentist through a friend when I was having a lot of pain. He was sooooo nice and so were all his staff and they have remained so. Now I go for checkups and a cleaning twice a year (covered by my work benefits) and most recent work has just been replacing old fillings as needed. I did have an issue with a molar this past Spring and it was decided that it wasn't worth trying to save it so it was pulled - all over with in about 30 seconds with no after effects.
    I brush and floss morning and night and and even keep a brush at the office to brush after lunch.
    I did have to have a lot of adult orthodontic work done in my 30's and 40's (including jaw surgery) so I am determined to keep them in top condition after all that work!

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  12. My dental experiences were much the same as yours Ilona, why they thought that children didn't need anaesthetic in those days I really can't understand! I've had the same dentist for the last 12 years or so, funnily enough he was called Mr Stone as well, a lovely man who did a couple of root canals on me and more or less cured my phobia of the dentist. However, he has moved on, sadly. (to Great Yarmouth!) and now I have a new dentist, a spanish boy who looks to be about 12 years old. Unfortunately I broke a front crown recently on my breakfast cereal, cost me £220 (watch out anyone who eats Aldi's Malted Wheaties, you really have to leave them to soak in the milk for at least 10 minutes beforehand and even then they can be deadly!) and he got a new crown made and fixed for me. What a trial it was getting the old stuck on bits off though, took about 15 minutes with what felt like a jack-hammer, I thought he was going to knock my teeth out. Had to have anaesthesia as well as it was all too much for me. Then later on the same thing again getting the temporary filling off before fitting the new crown. Anyway, all's well now, it's just about settling down now after 8 weeks or so....the boy did a good job though I have to say.

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  13. Perfect gnashers.....good. My grandparents had a holiday home in Great Yarmouth but it got bombed in the WWII. I'm looking forward to your pics. Natalie

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  14. I always had cavities when I was young and had to go to the dentist a lot. When I was nine I would only wear one dress to the dentist. I called it "The Blood Dress". It was overkill, but I guess I was a bit goth. Hated the dentist.

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  15. OOOOHHH I hate the dentist too, Will have to be thinking of going though as have some loose teeth due to my copd meds. Just found your blog. Will add to follow.
    hugs June

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  16. Hi.Am glad that your "teef" are in tip shop shape, Ilona..I never saw a dentist in my childhood at all.I know sounds very neglectful. the norm back then in our immigrant family was to go if you had a problem not if you were fine.So,you can imagine my dentist being very surprised that my first dental exam was with him and at twenty one years of age.We did not get school teeth exams but our family doctor would do that.As children my Mum would line us up in the kitchen before bed and we'd have our spoon of codliver oil.Maybe that helped our dental health.I am diligent about the brushing and flossing daily and will use a plaque loosening mouthwash when my teeth feel a little bit fuzzy.I feel grateful to have my strong teeth and jawbones and look after them.Having dentures is not an experience I look forward to and I hope to keep my own teeth far into my dotage.A dental visit with nothing special would be in the $150.00 range here.I try to just get a visit over with,and not feed any anxiety I might be experiencing,a few deep breaths always helps me settle down.Your upcoming holiday sounds fun and I look forward to reading about it.Bye for now,D.

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  17. As I said above, it's my worst nightmare but we should all be brave and see our dentist. My paternal grandmother delayed seeing her dentist after suffering toothache for 6 months. She finally went when the pain was too much. After a suspicious looking growth was found she had a biopsy and was found to have cancer in her jaw. She died 2 years later at age 61.

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  18. I was born and raised in the UK and came to the USA 30 years ago. As a kid, I was absolutely terrified of the dentist .... I had a lot of cavities and rotten teeth due to zero dental hygiene in the home so I really suffered in my youth with teeth that needed big fillings, tooth extractions, the whole bit. I found my dentist newly graduated from dental school when I moved to the US and have been with him ever since .... can't let anyone else tamper with my mouth LOL Even though I have moved far from his dental practice (100 miles or so) I make the drive to see him because he is the only one I can trust. Crazy to make such a long drive but that is the far reaching effect of having been butchered by british dentists LOL

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  19. I never minded going to the dentist, although I never enjoyed it. I did not want a mouth full of black, rotten teeth (used to be more common than now) and I wanted to keep all of my teeth. So far, except for wisdom teeth, I have succeeded. I am 69 and remember when they would fill kids' teeth without novacaine. Not mine, they didn't! BTW, I never had orthodontia (parents would never have paid for it). Bottom teeth are spaced far apart in front and are food-catchers, but my top teeth are nice and straight. Luck of the draw.

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  20. I used to be afraid of the dentist and the school one took out a few teeth without thinking of filling etc. When I was 21 I worked for the police and I went to the police dentist (well the one they used) He was marvellous and I was never afraid with him. I even went to him when we moved miles away and then followed him around, as I would have been scared going to someone else. When he retired, I decided I needed to see someone local if I was changing and I have found a fabulous lady, Joanne, who both husband I adore. She has the lightest touch of all with the needle. I've neglected my teeth this year with husband's heart attack as appointment was at that time. Then mum not being well. I have now booked an appointment at the end of this month, phew..

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