Sunday, 23 October 2016

Home made shopping bags are in fashion

Hello and Good Morning. Here's another colourful post for you. Why do shopping bags have to be dull, boring, plain, brown, grey, plastic, or covered in advertising logo's? There are alternatives. Let's brighten things up and make shopping bags a fashion accessory. Let's have them in a multitude of colours and designs. Let's use up all the spare fabric we have and make pretty fabric bags which can be washed and used for years. Here's my latest selection just finished. 
Made from fabric sample books so the two sides are different. I found some extra fabric for the handles so they don't match, but it doesn't matter. The sample books were included in my £5 basket when I last went shopping in the Scrapstore, so these cost virtually nothing.

If you don't have a Scrapstore, you could look in car boot sales and charity shops for cheap fabric. Curtains work well, bed throws, as well. Anyone with a sewing machine can make shopping bags. Let's all brighten up the High Street, the shopping malls, the markets and supermarkets. Are you game for this? Go on, give it a go. Show off your own home made shopping bag with pride.

How to make a shopping bag.

Thank's for popping in, I've got things to do, we'll catch up soon. Enjoy your Sunday.
Toodle pip.
PS. When I say, 'we'll catch up soon', there is no particular time scale on that, it could be anytime.

29 comments:

  1. They are wonderful, I have been making mine for a long time and always have one with me. I refuse to pay the 5p for a carrier bag.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Ilona, your bags look lovely. When I make some I put longer fatter handles on, I like to be able to sling one onto a shoulder. I don't make them so long that I can't carry them by hand, just right for both (for me). I absolutely love love love the new pic of Rocky and Mayze. It's taken ages to type this by the way, this is my really old laptop and some(many!) of the keys keep missing. I have to absolutely insist they appear... Have a good day - sunny down south today. Love, Elaine B

    ReplyDelete
  3. I went with my school in 1976 or 77 (nor could have been 75) and I bought a fabric bag from the SS Uganda that we were sailing around the med on. Still in use as a receptacle for dusters in my parents' kitchen. I have got some plastic bags from the 1970's too - the plastic was ever so thick then. I use my wicker basket that I brought my cookery home that I made in school (school for me was 1967 to 1980). Your bags look lovely. Natalie

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've just been learning how to make bags from men's ties. They're apparently a nightmare to recycle because they get wound round the machinery and the charity shops don't want many as people don't wear them much.
    Arilx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those sound cool but beyond my skills. Hope to see your results

      Delete
  5. Ilona, your bags are gorgeous! Most of mine are rather plain looking. Must look for some jazzy ones like yours. I am NOT a sewer!
    Love the photo of Rocky and Mayze.

    ReplyDelete
  6. First picture, top row, 2nd from left is my favourite. If I was near I'd buy it at your sale!
    Although I've still got several of the hessian type that Mid Suffolk DC gave away every year at the Potato day that we used to go to.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm still using the bag that you made for me. It still looks as new as when it arrived and I opened your parcel, it gets lots of compliments as I load masses of shopping into it. It's pretty much the perfect bag as it's lightweight and folds up so small when it's empty, holds lots of shopping and doesn't crease after living folded up in the car in between uses (that's why it still looks new I think). Thank you. xx

    ReplyDelete
  8. I too use an old wicker basket from school 'cookery' days (it's 40+ years old now and still going strong). I keep cardboard boxes in the boot of the car as well so can easily transport from supermarket to car boot and car to kitchen. I absolutely detest to see the plastic bags littering hedges/verges and footpaths. They are a scourge on our society in UK; awful for landfill and cruel to birds and mammals that may get caught in them and die. I have fabric shopping bags that my mother made from old curtains still in use (she made them in the mid 70s), just goes to show how things can last and stop this 'throw-away' attitude some have. Amanda

    ReplyDelete
  9. They are much nicer than placcy bags. We need to think of ways to make shopping bags more masculine though. I can't remember last time I paid for a bag but my hubby buys one every time he goes to the shop. He's a very blokely-bloke.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will look for some manly fabric.

      Delete
  10. If I can get a sewing machine maybe even someone all thumbs like me could make one. I do have many store bought ones and some conferences I use but yours are so much better.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'm not surprised there, in uk, because I realized while visiting my sister that in every shop they never give you a carrier bag without paying for it. In the USA where we are not so Eco conscious, they just give out wads of plastic bags, but I reuse every one for trash.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Lovely, Ilona. Must confess that I use two fold up/zip up type bags when out shopping, though I have two aged baskets which belonged to my Grandmother, and two heavy canvas bags also, useful if we go out for the day, slippers, dog food, etc.

    The bedspread I had in my "new" bedroom - I shared before it was built, is still in use, as covers for tables when we do displays, food, etc at our local church, and at a rough guess is over sixty years old.

    We don't buy bags from supermarkets any more, but I hang on to any carrier bag which arrives with something in it, last week I snaffled three, which I re-use as rubbish bags before putting them in the bin, and also use them when we are away in the caravan for the same purpose.

    I hope your stall does really well.

    ReplyDelete
  13. well done Ilona - quite a stock there. I have made loads and given them away over the years. They last. Others have mentioned them in trees etc- I get made seeing bottles and tins just thrown away. Hope they do put a returnable deposit on them because it will help as well.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I'm in. Never made one before but have been squirreling material away for ages so I will give it a go. Wish me luck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good luck, give it a go. A tip, I put three rows of stitching around the top so the handles are fixed firmly to the bag.

      Delete
  15. I can certainly vouch that your bags are incredibly strong- I've been using them in my house move and they're going strong! Been moving my books in them. Glad to see you are keeping well Ilona, I'm catching up after a few days,xxxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know you are busy Sis, good to see you here. Hope the move goes smoothly.

      Delete
  16. Love your practical, colourful bags. Here is South Australia we are not given free plastic bags at supermarkets. (You can buy bags for 15 cents each! I refuse to do that.) Some stores do give heavier glossy plastic bags (clothing stores etc.)These bags do last longer than one use! But they are still plastic and create the same environmental issues. At conferences re useable bags cloth are often given out containing handouts pens etc. I have quite a collection of cloth re useable bags that last for ages. Yours are gorgeous and I am inspired to make some really colourful ones.
    I have been making small bags using the your pattern as gifts for new babies and children. I put a couple of story books inside and hope that having a library bag encourages the parents to use their library and read with their children. Sadly a thing that seems to have been greatly replaced by watching DVDs!
    Kids need books so that is my bit towards encouraging reading together. I continue to give books for birthdays....
    Love, love, love the bags. Cheers Jo

    ReplyDelete
  17. I just made 14 fabric shopping bags from fabric someone gave me for free. It was a lightweight drapery fabric with gorgeous roses on it. The bags look just like yours. Gave 4 to mom and kept the others for home and the cars. May give some others away to friends who will use them. Ana usa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good for you Ana. It's good to give stuff away.

      Delete
  18. Love your bags Ilona I never buy bags from the shops but reuse bread bags and others for rubbish. I work in the local hospice shop and recently we had a new shop overseer manager join and he introduce strong carrier bags with out name on them to give to customers. There is no limit to what a person spends so many people will buy one little item and ask for a bag, I am disgusted, I don't work on the till and if I did I would certainly not give them out so freely. I have made a few bags for my craft stall I am having in November, and the ones the WI made in Seotember sold very well at there fair.
    Enjoy your week of to make some aprons now.
    Hazel c uk

    ReplyDelete
  19. you have a lot of influence over your fellow bloggers...first you build a shed then they want a shed building then you sew lovely bags and they sew trumped up bags but try and make money from the gullible lot that read the blog....you really are the real deal iona imitation is very sincere flattery
    all the best tess

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That made me laugh, I do notice things xxx

      Delete
    2. Me too- hehehehehe! To think people are buying the bags too.

      (moderated by the moderator)

      Delete
  20. not meant overly nastily just observation glad you took it in the spirit it was meant
    tess

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Simple little things tickle my fancy ;o)

      Delete
  21. Lovely bags Ilona and great that you do all this for a good cause and not to make money yourself. Kristel

    ReplyDelete