Wednesday, 19 October 2016

What can you do with a tin of peas

Hello. There are some days when I don't mind what I eat, as long as it's cheap and fills me up. Saying that, you won't find any meat or fish in my fridge, unless it's cheap white fish for the cats, I no longer buy ready meals either. I will sometimes splash out a bit more dosh for something extra delicious, but not very often because I can make tasty food from scratch myself. So, I buy my food on price. My meals don't always look appetizing, my aim is to eat it, not to step back and admire my handiwork. 
A while ago I picked up a dented tin of mushy peas from Tesco, maybe I ought it eat it. 
My lunch yesterday was a spud in the microwave and half of the peas. Scoff scoff, it filled my tum, and at only 15p, it was a bargain. Bags of spuds are in season and cheap at the moment.

Dinner last night was steamed sprouts, broccoli, potatoes, and an onion, topped with the other half of the peas. Another tum filler at possibly 40p, a wild guess.

This is ten shopping bags waiting to be assembled. I had a fabric sample book from the Scrapstore and took it apart. The pieces weren't big enough to make a complete bag and handles, so I have used other fabric for the handles. I don't think it will matter, the two sides will be different anyway because there is only one sample of each. Best get on with it then. Need them for the Christmas Fair.  

Thanks for all your comments on the previous post, it's good to hear that we are all on the same wavelength. Thanks for popping in, we'll catch up soon.
Toodle pip

37 comments:

  1. Don't tell anyone but I quite often have a tin of mushy peas (with lots of pepper) for breakfast. I absolutely love them.

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  2. I love mushy peas, never bought any in a shop, for a treat have fish/chips/mushy peas from the local 'chippy' (the portions are huge - maybe it's just my fish and chip shop - but I can never manage to eat a portion for one, it's 2 meals for me). I like to sprinkle brown vinegar on mushy peas. Your plate with all the lovely green vegetables is so good for you, I found a reduced bag of kale when shopping and thought 'give it a whirl'; steamed it and sprinkled on a little oil - delicious. I was early today for an appointment and popped into the nearest store - Waitrose, I don't shop here - nearly fainted; small cartons of soup started at £2.95 up to £4.50! Amanda

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  3. I find I get more creative, or less picky, as the month wears on, for meal preparation. Perhaps I need to start the month less picky as well. If it tastes good when there is little left in the cupboard, why wouldn't it be just as tasty any other time. Good strategy, though I like a pretty looking plate of food.

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  4. I am not a big fan of peas, but I do eat them. Your meals may not always look like something out of a food magazine, but they are always healthy and that is what keeps you going strong.

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  5. I liked mushy peas at one time but now I don't - I don't know why. I'm very apt to being sick (proper peddle dashing) so don't know if I was sick after having mushy peas. I definitely don't like tomato soup. I use lots of spices and pepper in my cooking. I don't have a very good appetite so I do try and serve my cuisine well on the plate - anything to help me. Your food always looks good. Natalie

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  6. Mix them with mint and an onion and make soup.
    Arilx

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  7. mushy peas can be made into curry sauce. yum

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    1. What a great idea!!!

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  8. Do any of your readers know a good recipe for making mushy peas from scratch? I never see them even in the Imported food aisle here in the U.S. They are probably in the British specialty shops but would be very pricey. JanF

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    1. I think you can make them with dried peas, I've never tried it.

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    2. Yes, you can make them from whole dried peas. I buy a two pound package for less then $3.00 at my Persian grocery store. They're labeled for Indian market/cuisine. Soak overnight in hot water with a teaspoon of baking soda. The next day, rinse and add fresh water and cook on the stove, adding water as necessary. Add seasonings enjoy. One cup of dried peas makes large serving.

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    3. I worked in a fish and chip shop about 20 years ago - we used to make our mushy peas by the bucket full. Peas soaked the night before with a large tablet (must have been baking soda) then rinsed and cooked in a very large pan. Sold by the portion they were a good profit maker :) I still love mushy peas but buy them in a tin now.

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  9. Dinner tonight is 25p piece of liver, couple of mushrooms, 1/2 tomato, few frozen peas all in a casserole mixed with herbs, black pepper, marmite and some powdered potato to thicken it all it will be cooked in the microwave. I am not a big vegetable eater but do have lots of fresh fruit. Thanks for all the tips Ilona..

    Happy eating,
    Hazel c uk


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  10. I buy a tin of mushy peas weekly, because they are yummy and at 15p a tin for two meals you can't go wrong, they are fab with chips. My friend loves them in a sandwich.

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  11. Another vote for pea soup here. So easy to make with a vegetable stock cube and a few herbs.

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    1. Pea soup is delicious, can also be made with frozen peas.

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  12. I hear that microwaving your food turns it (molecularly speaking) into someTHING that your body doesnt even recognise as food. . .even though your tastebuds may. The Russian military ditched 'em for their troops DECADES ago, SO bad are they for the health. . . . . .just a thought.

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    1. That story has been around for years. Load of old cobblers.

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  13. You,missus are a veritable legend! One of your food dishes has fish on it? In the food gallery section?

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    1. Well spotted. That's an old photo, Dean. I haven't eaten fish for a couple of years, maybe longer.

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  14. I knew someone who's Mom would blend up a can of peas, add some spices, (and bacon bits if any crumbs left from bacon cooking), and dish it out as pea soup. It was topped with any/all of the following..Pepper/Croutons/Grated - shredded cheese / diced bits of ham

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  15. Grandchildren love mushy peas, made with dried peas .steeped overnight with boiling water and baking soda, then bring to the boil and simmer

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  16. Mushy peas with mint sauce dribbled on them. Yum!

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  17. Slightly off the mushy peas theme but my favourite cheap and super quick dinner is to mix as tin of baked beans with a tin of drained and rinsed red kidney beans add a good splodge of tomato puree, garlic puree and as much chilli powder as you are happy with, voila instant dinner great with rice or baked potato or in warmed pitta bread and only one saucepan to wash!

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  18. I think tins of mushy peas are a British thing. Most people here would never buy a can of peas or very seldom. We like them fresh or frozen.

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  19. Your mushy peas look like our English peas mashed. I might not get along in UK because I am allergic to peas, the kind in your pictures. So is my daughter.

    I have a question. I have a can of Ambrosia Devon Rice Pudding. It is from the UK. It sound sloppy when I shake it, sort of like mushy peas might. I have eaten rice pudding my mother made and I made. It is a firm dish made in the oven. This is an unknown.

    It has directions for heating. I eat my rice pudding hot from the oven or cold from the refrigerator. What do you do with this? Are you familiar with the brand? How much would it be in UK? Reading the ingredients it seems mostly dairy. That is not a bad thing. Maybe my homemade may be, also.

    How do you eat this,right from the can, cold or hot? Do you put anything in it. Raisins seem like a good addition plus a little cinnamon.
    pparsimony

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    1. Eat hot or cold as the rice is cooked, add whatever your heart desires to it but be warned it's very very sweet. Don't like it myself but love homemade.

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    2. We had Ambrosia Creamed Rice as a dessert once a week all the time I was growing up. Mum used to serve it cold with some canned fruit on top. I liked it at the time but would not eat it now.

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    3. I love Ambrosia creamed rice. I could eat a whole tin of it, but usually share it hot with my daughter who likes a dollop of jam in the middle :)

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    4. Ilona - I've made bags in the past from sample books. I would cut 2 pieces of fabric in half and then join them together, so the front and back would then match - just an idea for something different :)

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  20. Wel, I was asked by a friend in France to please bring some mushy peas with me on my next visit,so I took 4 tins, He hasn't opened them yet just looks at them he wants to savour the experience!!!!oh and some weetabix!

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  21. I think real mushy peas are made with marrowfat peas, so not the same to just soak the dried peas we get here (in the U.S.) JanF

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    1. You are correct....I tried and tried to remember that name! The peas I buy at my Persian market are marrowfat peas grown in Canada.

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  22. I can get the boxes of Marrowfat peas in the shops here but I can also get mushy peas from my local Fish & Chip restaurant - love them - don't go too often as I need to watch the calories but when I do I also have brown bread and butter - it just all seems to go together so well.
    I rather enjoy cooking and when I'm in the mood can easily spend the day in the kitchen working on all sorts of dishes but I find more and more that I only actually "cook" once or twice a week - the rest of the time I tend to make up plates like you Ilona from all the bits and pieces in the fridge and pantry. Always have lots of fruit & veg on hand and with eggs, cheese and some tinned salmon or tuna I can easily get through the week without making things too complicated. Just finishing a large bowl of salad filled with all kinds of bits and pieces and it tastes lovely!

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  23. Just catching up and read your last post on economizing. I'd like to add that in addition to watching the price when you check out at the market, you need to examine the price on the shelf.

    Last week I could buy a pound of butter for $2.98 or a bundle of two pounds (same brand) for $6.98. Duh!

    I was buying corned beef and Swiss cheese from the deli for Rueben sandwiches and I needed a pound of corned beef for $9.98 and a half pound of cheese for $7.48/lb or $3.74. A total of $13.72. Then I noticed a bundle sign on the top of the deli case, a pound of meat and half pound of cheese for $9.00 - less than the meat if bought separately AND you got the cheese. Again, same brand. I was shopping at Walmart. Now I examine shelf prices carefully.

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