Wednesday, 20 February 2013

A walk from Hull City Centre to Paull

Aaahhhh, that's better, fully refreshed after a good nights sleep. Yesterday I walked 14.3 miles, not a great distance for me, easily achievable in the five and a half hours it took me. I bought a new Ordnance Survey map last week of Kingston upon Hull and surrounding areas, more places to explore in a day out.
It was a last minute decision to go out, there was a record on the radio just before 9am in the morning, some pop group singing 'Should I stay, or should I go'. I looked out of the window and decided to go. It was very misty but the sun was trying to break through, it had the potential of being a nice day, so I quickly stuffed a few things in my little backpack and drove to Barton to catch the bus over the Humber Bridge to Hull. I got out at the bus station in the city centre and started walking. I planned to walk eastbound for as far as I could alongside the river, there was a good path marked on the map.
I crossed the busy main A63 road and headed for the Marina. In the first three photo's you can see a lovely blue sky, it wasn't so blue looking in the other direction over the water, there was still a heavy mist swirling about. I love the ornate top of the Whittington & Cat Public House. It's so nice that it has been preserved.  
There are always a lot of boats in the Marina.
The Minerva Pub has been talked about a lot by Burnsy on his morning show on BBC Radio Humberside. It's future has been hanging in the balance for a long time. There have been a lot of financial problems and it has recently been closed for a while. I spoke to the men working on the front cleaning it up, they tell me that it has a new owner so things may be looking up. I have found a smashing article about it, you may wish to read more about this historical pub.
Onward along the waters edge I went. Next comes a few misty photo's, looking out over the Humber.
A jogger passes me. Looks like the timbers from the old docks have been left in place. The paved walkway continues for quite a long distance making easy walking.
Relics of old piers, warehouses, and landing stages. The sun was making a valiant attempt to break through.



I passed a large sign which said that the lock gates may be open further ahead to allow boats to pass through to enter Alexandra Dock, and there could ba a two hour period when the path would be inaccessible to walkers and cyclists. There was no indication of the times that this may happen, so I took my chances and carried on along the concrete walkway. Some fifteen minutes later I arrived at the lock only to find the gates open, my way was closed. I pondered for a few minutes, wondering if I should retrace my steps and go the long way round. Then I noticed these two little boats, side by side, hooked up together, heading towards the lock. Are my prayers about to be answered? They were.  
Their shift was over, and they entered the lock.
Parked up for a few minutes while the first gates were closed, waiting for the second gates further down to open. My path is about to be re instated.
Now I can cross, phew, that's a relief.
The next landmark along the waters edge is King George Dock, where the big passenger ferries come into. This is The Pride of Rotterdam, which parks just outside the dock entrance. The Zeebrugge ferry goes into the dock, I couldn't get close enough for a good picture of that.
At this point the footpath goes up some steps and over the top of the road which takes the cars onto the ferry. Still a bit of mist about.

I took a couple of pics of the docks on the other side as I was going over the top.

Next there was a long walk alongside a lot of sheds. This is Salt End Jetty. At this point the path goes inland a bit, and goes round the outer edges of an industrial area. The noise from the chemical works and power station was deafening, a good idea to take the hearing aid out, ha ha.  
I came across this fox snoozing in the afternoon sun. By this time it had warmed up, turning into a beautiful sunny day. I got quite hot.
Now according to the map the path I am following comes to an abrupt end, but no matter, I was going to try my luck and see if I could find a way to join the road. A big sign told me that the path was ending, but I saw some tyre marks on the ground which told me that cyclists have passed that way before, so I followed their tracks. I knew I had to cross a railway line, but as luck would have it, it was a disused line so easy to cross. Then I came across a couple of Environmental Agency vans, they must have been driven there from the road. I asked the man if I could walk to the road. He said yes, follow the track. Whooppeeee, YES, I came out just where I wanted to be. Next was a bit of road walking. I had made my mind up to walk to Paull, a village further down the Humber. There was a footpath from the road which would take me there. As I had done a big loop, I found myself on the other side of the Salt End Jetty. This is where the tanker ships come in, to service the huge chemical works.
Here we are in Paull. In the main street is this lighthouse. Looks rather grand standing at the junction where two roads meet, close to the waters edge.

There is a museum just outside the village, closed for the winter, open again in March. Taken from the web site. Explore 500 years of history within the walls of this superb Napoleonic fortress set in 10 acres with magnificent views over the Humber estuary. It has quite an interesting history, check out wiki if you want to know more. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Paull

My mission was to carry on walking untill I could walk no further. There is a little peninsular which juts out onto the mud. It's called Cherry Cobb Sand Bank. Almost there, a couple of light houses to pass.  

That's it, the end of the path, time to go back.
Twas a lovely day out. I retraced my steps back to Paull village, hoping to get a bus back to Hull. Couldn't understand the timetable at the shelter, it looked as if it might be another hour before a bus arrived. I decided to walk to Hedon, another couple of miles, a bigger place so a better chance of getting a bus. Again my luck was holding out, I arrived at the bus stop and within ten minutes a bus arrived. Straight into the bus station to get my connection back across the bridge to Barton and my waiting car. Brilliant. Didn't spend any money, took my own food and drink. Can't beat it. Toodle pip.

33 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing your walking journeys with us - I enjoy them and am so impressed by how capable and independent you are. I'm a good bit younger then you and am certain I would get lost and tired long if I took on one of these long walks. Do you carry a compass? How did you learn to read the maps? Have you always done long distance walking? Do you ever feel unsafe?

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    1. Hi Anon. Thank you for your comment. I have noted your questions and I am putting together a mini series on walking, which will hopefully give you the information you request.

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  2. I saw that boat too! We had a day out in Hull and went to the Deep.Very misty day. I think you walked a bit more than us though. Lovely pics.

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  3. I love that area down by the Humber it is so atmospheric and your photos are fabulous! We explored Sunk Island last year, we've visited Hull so often but not really been down there before - it's like another world..... We also tried to walk down Spurn Point but had the dog with us and that isn't allowed so we had to change our plans which was a shame. Thanks for sharing your walk and photos :0)

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    1. Shame that dogs are not allowed on Spurn Point, but understandable I suppose. I read that all the residents have moved out now and relocated further inland, due to the long distanced they had to travel to work, school, and shops.

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  4. So glad you decided to go walking Ilona, I love being out with you.
    I knew you were feeling quite cooped up in the house, so I'm happy for you to get out again.
    Loved the snoozing fox and the lighthouse that looks just like a house.
    Lovely photos as usual and a very informative post...thanks

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  5. That was a very picturesque walk you did. I enjoyed all your photos. I would be tempted to go into that first pub. The building is so pretty. I also was wondering if you have ever been in a scary situation on any of your walks? I hope not. Glad that you had a nice day out yesterday. It was supposed to be a nice day here and it got up to 40 degrees F but then it started raining and continued to rain all afternoon so even though it wasn't freezing cold out, it turned out to be a nasty, windy chilly day.

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    1. Hi, I ought to go inside the pubs I pass, but I am worried that they might expect me to buy something, ha ha. Seems daft to buy a drink when I am already carrying one.

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  6. A cracking walk - and what lovely photographs!

    Nice to see that the Minerva hasn't been flattened - The Hull Maritime Festival used to use it as a singing and music venue. I seem to remember that there were regular music sessions there on Tuesday (?) evenings.....but I know nothing - I'm a man, see ;-). I hope the pub survives.

    Keep up the good walks!

    JJ

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    1. Hi John. I like to see a lot of different things when I am walking. Variety is the spice of life for me.

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  7. What a smashing walk. The lighthouse is beautiful and I love the sweet fox snoozing in the grass. x

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    1. Yes, the fox was lovely and didn't seem intimidated by my presence. He just lifted his sleepy head, and continued to sleep.

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  8. Lovely tour of the area - loved Paull and all your pictures of the area (all from the comfort of my couch !) Kidding really, too cold and too much snow here to walk anywhere but hope to keep up with you starting soon.
    I often wonder about security when walking but if you walk fast and assertively that solves a lot of problems. However there are people out there who are looking for an opportunity............

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  9. That was great Ilona! Your pictures are lovely but especially number eight,it took my breath away it is so stunning.
    Jane x

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  10. It looks a lovely place to visit, I think I may take a look myself this year, thanks - Pauline

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  11. I really enjoyed this post. It sounds like a great walk and your pictures are brilliant. I like the snoozing fox and the misty ones are really atmospheric.

    I finally have some good news on the teaching front. Do you recall that conversation we had when we walked in the summer and I said it was so hard to get a place on the teacher training courses? Well on my third attempt I've finally done it! At last I'm going to have a career and a full time job! It was worth persevering.

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    1. Hi Louise. I remember it well, and how disappointed you were to get turned down the second time. Glad to hear it is third time lucky for you. Goes to show persistance pays off. Good luck with your training, and I hope you have a long and happy career.

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  12. Brilliant pictures once again. It's great to learn about the heritage of different places.

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  13. Great photos. Have you walked along the track from Hull to Hornsea ? I've cycled that way and it was really nice over the fields.

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    1. No I haven't been that way. One to do in the future I think.

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  14. What a lovely outing! Fabulous pictures, too!!!

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  15. Had some problems trying to post my comment, so at the risk of repeating myself, I enjoyed your walk and pics. I have never heard of Paull fort before. After looking at their 2012 programme it is somewhere my grandchildren will love. A few trips for us this year methinks.

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  16. Wow I am not sure I could walk that far!!!

    LOVE LOVE LOVE the pictures in the mist

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  17. What a great post, you had a brilliant day out and we all got to share it. There are such a lot of places of interest.when you look for them.

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  18. What a wonderful history/walking lesson! Thanks for the tour!

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  19. I started reading your blog several months ago to follow your walks, I really enjoyed all the photos. You are an amazing lady to go it on your own. Good for you!

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  20. Hi Ilona What a fantastic day Iv'e really enjoyed looking at the photo's I feel as if I was walking with you. Just shows if you put your mind to it the winter blues can be beaten, just put on those walking shoes and WALK!!! Kind regards Jeanxx

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  21. I love the contrast from the blue sky to the mist in the photos. The lighthouse on the corner is one of my favourites as is Fort Paull which I've never heard of.

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  22. Got out our map again to see where you have been! Lots of great pics to go with your descriptions, they made it so enjoyable. We liked the first lighthouse and couldn't believe how close you got to the fox - what a scoop.
    Wendy (Wales)

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  23. Those atmospheric sea shots are wonderful.

    Sue xx

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  24. What a great walk! :)
    I just did it myself the other day but I might have to try doing it on a cold, misty morning. It looks wonderful :)

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  25. Just read this; the photos are beautiful and I am so glad that Hull is seen in such a positive way. I have worked there for a long time in the past and grew up on the north bank, I think it is sorely under-rated. I love north Humberside. You've inspired me to want to go walking there. Yorkshire lass.

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