Monday, 7 June 2021

Over the bridge to Hessle.

It's ages since I last walked over the Humber bridge. It was a nice afternoon, after the heavy rain had finished, so I drove to Barton and parked underneath the bridge. There are steps to get up onto it. They closed the foot and cycle path a few weeks ago because seven people had jumped off the bridge in a short period of time. Now there are extra cameras, and a patrol in a buggy goes across. Posters have been put up giving the telephone number of the Samaritans. 
The view across to the Tile Works at Barton. 

The road is on a higher level than the path. 
Arriving at the toll booths on the north bank. Just to the left here are some steps which go down into the Country Park. 

Through part of the Country Park, walk under the railway tunnel and the road tunnel and it brings you to Hessle Foreshore. 
I think this is old windmill is a monument, I have never seen any activity here. There is a hotel and restaurant next to it. 

I was rather hoping to have a nice walk on the path on the waters edge, which is part of the Yorkshire Wolds Way. However the whole area was a building site. There are two rows of cottages, it must be hell to live there while all this is going on. As well as the constant rumble of the traffic crossing the bridge there is deafening noise coming from the construction machinery. I asked one of the workmen what are they building over in the corner. He said it is a Care Home. I won't be booking a place in there.  
A lot of the work is to create flood defenses. 

Pretty little cottages. Once this mess gets cleared away it will be busy once more with people out for a walk. 

I walked as far as the end of the fenced off area, then turned round and came back. Over in the distance is Hull Docks. You can see there is a North Sea Ferry in. 
Looking over to the south bank you can see the pier and works at New Holland, with a bit of zoom. 

Turn around point. The benches are being eaten by the weeds. 
A tropical island with a sandy beach and blue sea? No, a pebbly shoreline next to a mucky river. 

Getting back on the bridge to return to the car. The A63 trunk road into and out of Hull. The River Humber meets the River Ouse a few miles on over there.  
A little over five miles walked today. It was very warm. 
Thanks for popping in. Toodle pip.   ilona

5 comments:

  1. a bit warm for walking.You did well 5 miles covered. Strange , where they decide to build care homes. Theres one in Derby between Siddals road and the newer road to Pride Park.Another at the corner of Raynesway and Derby rd.Hope they have good glazed windows.

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  2. What an interesting walk. Loved the windmill. What a shame it hasn't been restored to working order. Where I grew up was the remains of a windmill - just walls a few feet high, but it has now been totally restored. Stone ground bread flour is just THE best for breadmaking.

    That row of cottages is so pretty but I guess their value is hit by the bridge being so close and overhead.

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  3. I can remember seeing the Humber bridge many many years ago when we were on our way for a holiday in Bridlington although I dont think we have ever driven over it.How sad that people have jumped from it.Their Families must have been destroyed,but its good how they have put Samaritans phone numbers for those poor souls who need someone to talk to.Your view of Hull docks brought back memories of getting the ferry from there,again many years ago for an over night crossing to Belgium.Food and cabins were lovely but the crossing was very rough!It was a very interesting walk though and thank you for sharing it with us.xx

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  4. Thank you ilona for the great pictures. Love seeing your country. Blessings to you. Have a wonderful Tuesday.

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  5. Heres a strange one for you , my great grandad was the miller at Hessle many years ago

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