Tuesday, 21 July 2020

Feet up after a long walk, and another walk on day 3.

Hello. I start this post with a video I made at the end of day 2. Chilling back at the camp site. 
Day three was decision time, do I go a short walk in the morning and get back to pack everything away and be off the site by 12 noon, or do I pack away after coffee and a bite to eat, then drive to another village and walk from there. I checked the map, North Grimston which is on the way home looks a good place to walk from and it's only 15 minutes away. 
That settled it, get packed up first then I have the rest of the day to go a walk. The Centenary Way footpath runs through the village, and the sign was right next to where I parked my car. Through a small wooded area and it opened out into a field. Look at this beauty, come to say hello. 
The path goes underneath this railway viaduct, no trains, the track has been dismantled. 

Then it opened out into this very pleasant walk passing the grazing sheep. 

The trees on each side were very picturesque.


Even the dead tree looked very arty. I like the skeletal look of dead trees. 

I'm glad they are in the next field.

I came off the footpath at Mill Farm, and turned northwards along the road. At the end I crossed over a  road to go down another path which was overgrown with wild flowers. These were taller than me. 
This path had a slight incline and became easier as it widened out. Just over the other side of a fence on my left it says on the map that there is a training ground. The thunder of hooves told me what kind of training ground it is. I stood and waited a few minutes to see if any more horses were going to come past. I hoped I pressed the shutter at the right moment. 
After stopping for a bite to eat, I crossed a busy road and carried on along another track, to Settrington. What a pretty village this is. The doors and windows of these houses were freshly painted. Just a bit further along the decorating man was having his break before carrying on with the rest of them. They looked lovely but what a boring job. I think they must have been estate houses for the workers because they all looked the same.  

The village looked tidy. I have hardly seen any litter at all anywhere. 

In the middle of the village is the Green. I was pleased to see that most of it had been left as a wild flower meadow, with only the edges and a walkway through it having been mowed. I stopped to say hello to a dog at gate, the owner came out and we got chatting, at a distance of course. I said I liked how the wild flowers had been left to grow. She surprised me by saying they were awful, and a lot of the villagers don't like them either. 
I left Setteringham on another section of the Centenary Way. Along the edges of fields back to North Grimston. I love this picture. 
What a fantastic finish to three days. I must go camping again. Here are the three walks marked on the OS map. The circle in the middle is the camp site. I always mark where I have walked with a felt tipped pen so I can find new routes in places I haven't been to before. I did a total of 28 miles. 
Now I have finished writing all that up I feel like I have done it all over again. I need a rest now. Thanks for popping in. Dinner time. Toodle pip.  ilona

16 comments:

  1. I really love your story's and adventures.your such a happy soul too.all your pictures are lovley.i always think what a capable lady you are well done for your sucsess

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  2. Oh, that Horse picture is Wonderful!! He looks like he is talking to the camera. So Beautiful! Thank you so much for sharing your camping trip!

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    1. I always stand still for a few minutes and talk to animals.

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    2. I use to walk down a country lane on the way to work a few years ago there use to be a beautiful horse there i talked to each day. It was the highlight of my day (i hated the job lol).

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  3. All I can say is Thank You so much for taking us with you.It has been lovely!.And from here in still Lock Down Leicester,it has been wonderful to see the outside world.A lot of people here,are still taking no notice...more than in April!.Thank you Ilona,xxx

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    1. Lets hope it doesn't last too long for you.

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  4. How lucky you are to be able to walk through farms and pretty villages like those. Here in Australia we don't have walking paths through farms. English country side is so charming. We have to walk on the roadsides. You are an inspiration, but I struggle to make myself walk out the door. Too hot, too cold, too windy, don't know what to wear etc etc. Help!

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    1. I quite often set off with too many clothes on and have to take a layer off. There are times when it is too hot here, so I don't go on a long walk. Maybe do something shorter, a two or three mile walk, maybe later on when it has cooled a bit. I don't mind wind, but I won't set off in pouring rain. If there is a shower when I am out I might put a waterproof jacket on which I carry in a back pack, or if it looks like it might blow over I will carry on and get wet. Once it stops raining I will soon dry out. I prefer skirts to trousers because they waft around your legs and don't stick to them.

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  5. The photo of the racehorses and riders resonated with me. I used to do that, but in a different time and place.

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  6. I like the wildflowers but perhaps the villagers are used to actually using the green?

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  7. I have loved following your adventures. Did you design the walks yourself from the map or were they out of a book? Also, how did you find somewhere to park for free on the last walk? I've never been a long distance walker, but you have inspired me to have a go, although I will need to build up my fitness levels slowly, even though I am younger than you! I admire your sense of adventure so much! Thanks for sharing it all with us!

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    1. I make up the walks myself from an Ordnance Survey map. There is a legend on each map which explains the markings, what type of footpath, track, or road. I don't use guide books.

      If I am out for a day walk I look for a parking spot, usually in a village or on the edge of a town. I don't park in quiet out of the way places, because it is obvious the car is going to be left for a while. I want to be close enough to houses on a quiet road with no restrictions, so that when people look out of their windows they can see the car. I am careful not to block anyone's entrance, or park opposite an entrance in case it makes it difficult get a large vehicle in and out. I look for a road wide enough that a lorry can get past, in case an emergency services vehicle needs access. I prefer to arrive with my walking boots already on so I am not making a show of the fact I am going for a walk. I pick my backpack up and exit the car and lock up quickly. I could be visiting someone nearby. If anyone sees me get out of the car they won't know how long I will be gone for. Hope that helps. Study a map, so you can identify which dotted lines are footpaths. Give it a go.

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    2. Thank you so much for such a helpful reply! I will give it a go indeed! I've just been looking at OS Explorer maps on Amazon. I think if I treat myself to one for my local area, that will be a good start, then I can gradually go further. You never know, I might even be signing up for your famous online walking club one of these days! I loved the information about your camping loo as well. You have to think about things like this when in the midst of a global pandemic, you can't just go to the loo anywhere! So this is valuable advice.

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