Monday, 1 June 2020

Years and Years- This is your fault

Up early to post the Walking Group check in page, saw this, and had to slip it in here. Ann Reid is brillant. The message here is plain and simple, we buy into consumerism and it's destroying the earth. Made ten years ago, it's still relevant. Have a quick butchers, see what you think. Is she a dotty old woman talking a load of cobblers, or is she sharing her wealth of knowledge gained from the University of Life?
Video owned by the BBC, shared from YouTube.



Walking Group Check in coming soon.
Toodle pip.  ilona

12 comments:

  1. Yes Ilona, she has a point.

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  2. Dear Ilona
    This was a really thought provoking series and sadly, the world is following the trajectory seen in the programme. It is set in the nearish future and dealt with all kinds of issues - pollution, refugees, illness, internment camps, politics, technology. This speech by Anne Reid was in the final episode I think. One line that has also stayed with me was when they finally removed a corrupt and quite evil prime minister, brilliantly played by Emma Thompson and the next PM seemed to be a bit of a joke, a bit buffoon-like. I think it was Anne Reid again, who said something like, 'he's laughing us all to hell'. I think Russell T. Davies, the writer, may have had access to a crystal ball...
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. I didn't see any of the series, I can't access the BBC, so I don't know what it was about.

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  3. Can't believe the vid is 10years old! I don't agree 100% with all her comments but yes I am guilty of being very short-sighted in the past. I think we have 'progressed', albeit at snail's pace, and in a piecemeal fashion. Still a long way to go, agreed.

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    1. Yes, I have been short sighted, buying cheap clothes because that's all I could afford. I did make some of my clothes when I was a teenager, and bought second hand later on in life though. I still avoid the automated checkouts, and will carry on doing that.

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  4. I can see her point, but I would argue the problem is that for the past 30 or 40 years we have kept electing governments that allow those who extract wealth from the rest of us, by whatever means they can, to flourish. It's easier to regulate commerce than human behaviour.

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  5. So up to date, it could have been made this week. I didn't watch it but I will have a look later.

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  6. Was it really made ten years ago? We only watched it last year on television. It was an absolutely brilliant series and really showed us what could happen ... and might yet happen :-(

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  7. Sadly still relevant 10 years on! The Blame Game makes people sit up and take notice but doesn't necessarily achieve its aim thereafter. People have to take more responsibility for what they do (this applies to the economy, the environment, their observing of the coronavirus rules). I think most people feel that, ultimately, as individuals what they do has little impact for good or ill. When the feel good factor from behaving well wears off, self interest kicks in again unless restraint is imposed by some outside force such as religion, financial penalties or social pressure. I hoped the pandemic might make people reassess how they live their lives but judging by behaviour this weekend, I think probably not in any long term way. Off on a walk now to raise my spirits!! Vicki

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  8. The series is from last year .... and I think too that Ann Reed has a point here. Many of our day-to-day actions have consequences if we like it or not.

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  9. Wow! She's right, you know.

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  10. So true - it's sad...especially in these trying times... We forget we are just quests on our planet

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